Obama Approves Transfer of Sensitive Space Technology to Red China, Ignores Law

July 24, 2012

The Obama administration recently notified Congress that it has agreed to license exports of sensitive U.S. space technology to China from a U.S. company that was fined in the past for illegally supplying space support that improved Chinese ballistic missiles.

The State Department’s Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, the unit that licenses exports of sensitive technology, notified House and Senate leaders on Wednesday of plans to go ahead with an export license for a deal between Space Systems/Loral and AsiaSat, a company owned in part by a Chinese state-run investment company linked to past satellite deals in the 1990s.

Additionally, U.S. government reports indicate that China’s People’s Liberation Army, which is currently engaged in a major space warfare program that involves anti-satellite missiles and lasers, used AsiaSat communications satellites in the past.

An intelligence report produced by the National Air and Space Intelligence Center stated that AsiaSat satellites were used by the People’s Liberation Army for military-related communications.

Congressional investigators who have been probing the Loral-AsiaSat deal since earlier this year are questioning whether it is legal under U.S. export laws and restrictions on transfers to China.

Documents obtained by the Free Beacon reveal that the Obama administration appeared to ignore two U.S. laws prohibiting space cooperation with China. They include sanctions against selling military goods to China imposed after the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre by Chinese military forces, and a 1999 law requiring all space exports to China to be treated as military transfers.

The State Department justified its approval of the Loral license as permitted under the 1992 U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act, which the department said exempts Hong Kong from other U.S. laws restricting exports of space technology and defense goods to China. The British colony reverted to Beijing control in 1997.

Investigators determined that AsiaSat is owned under a joint venture between General Electric Co. and state-owned China International Trust and Investment Corporation (CITIC). The two companies set up AsiaSat in the British Virgin Islands and named it Bowenvale Ltd.

GE’s plan to create the joint venture as a 50-50 ownership structure was opposed by State’s Office of Defense Trade Controls Compliance in 2007. Instead the ownership was structured so that GE and CITIC each owned 37.2 percent, with the remaining 25.6 percent ownership sold as stock on the Hong Kong exchange.

The State Department opposed the 50-50 ownership split over concerns it could give China a potential controlling interest.

However, congressional investigators also learned in June that AsiaSat plans to privatize the publicly held portion of the company in an apparent bid to avoid regulatory sanctions and compliance obligations of public companies.

The State Department told investigators in response that it held discussions with AsiaSat and agreed AsiaSat would not allow the privatized stock shares to be purchased by Chinese or other entities restricted from gaining access to U.S. space technology.

David S. Adams, assistant secretary of state for legislative affairs, stated in a July 18 letter to Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman Sen. John Kerry and House Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and their minority counterparts that unless Congress objects, the export license will be issued for the $263.4 million deal between Loral and Asia Satellite Telecommunications Co., Ltd (AsiaSat) and its Hong Kong representative, Barry Turner, a Canadian resident of Hong Kong. Thailand’s Thaicom Public Co., Ltd. also is part of the deal.

Congress has 28 days to decide whether or not to block the sale.

A spokesman for the House Foreign Affairs Committee said the panel is reviewing the notification. A Kerry spokeswoman had no immediate comment.

Loral spokeswoman Wendy Lewis said: “Space Systems/Loral is very rigorous in our compliance with export control regulations.”

According to U.S. officials, the export license will permit the transfer of what the congressional notification describes as “defense articles, including technical data, and defense services necessary for the post-preliminary design review design, manufacturing and delivery phases of AsiaSat 6 commercial communications satellite program.”

The satellite will provide commercial communications for India, Philippines, Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia, and China, and the Pacific region.

According to congressional investigators, the State Department also sought to dismiss concerns about the Chinese military’s use of AsiaSat satellites. A department official stated that if the AsiaSat communications satellite is commercial in nature and had no military-hosted payload, it is not viewed as having “military-related purposes,” and thus U.S. space cooperation would not be banned under U.S. laws.

Only if intelligence data showed that AsiaSat had allowed the Chinese military to put payloads on its satellites would enforcement action be taken, the State official said.

The license to AsiaSat is being carried out under the Arms Export Control Act, and is part of the Obama administration program of seeking a major loosening of export controls of sensitive technology.

Critics opposed to loosening export controls have said the new policy will help China’s large-scale military buildup, specifically its space warfare programs.

A joint State Department-Pentagon report made public in April warned that U.S. plans to loosen controls on satellite exports will boost China’s space warfare capabilities.

Because of close ties between Chinese civilian and military space development, there is a “high likelihood that space-related items and technology will be diverted from a civil use and applied to military programs,” under relaxed U.S. export controls, the report said.

“As China advances in operational space capabilities, it is actively focusing on how to destroy, disrupt, or deny U.S. access to our own space assets,” the report said.

The report said China is building several new classes of offensive missiles, upgrading older missile systems, and “developing space-based methods to counter ballistic missile defenses of the United States and our allies, including anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons.”

From:  http://freebeacon.com/obamas-lost-in-space/


Thanks, Obama! China Continues to Dump the Dollar; Has Now Divested Itself of 97% of U.S. Treasury Bills

June 4, 2011

(CNSNews.com) – China has dropped 97 percent of its holdings in U.S. Treasury bills, decreasing its ownership of the short-term U.S. government securities from a peak of $210.4 billion in May 2009 to $5.69 billion in March 2011, the most recent month reported by the U.S. Treasury.

Treasury bills are securities that mature in one year or less that are sold by the U.S. Treasury Department to fund the nation’s debt.

Mainland Chinese holdings of U.S. Treasury bills are reported in column 9 of the Treasury report linked here.

Until October, the Chinese were generally making up for their decreasing holdings in Treasury bills by increasing their holdings of longer-term U.S. Treasury securities. Thus, until October, China’s overall holdings of U.S. debt continued to increase.

Since October, however, China has also started to divest from longer-term U.S. Treasury securities. Thus, as reported by the Treasury Department, China’s ownership of the U.S. national debt has decreased in each of the last five months on record, including November, December, January, February and March. 

Prior to the fall of 2008, acccording to Treasury Department data, Chinese ownership of short-term Treasury bills was modest, standing at only $19.8 billion in August of that year. But when President George W. Bush signed legislation to authorize a $700-billion bailout of the U.S. financial industry in October 2008 and President Barack Obama signed a $787-billion economic stimulus law in February 2009, Chinese ownership of short-term U.S. Treasury bills skyrocketed.

By December 2008, China owned $165.2 billion in U.S. Treasury bills, according to the Treasury Department. By March 2009, Chinese Treasury bill holdings were at $191.1 billion. By May 2009, Chinese holdings of Treasury bills were peaking at $210.4 billion.

However, China’s overall appetite for U.S. debt increased over a longer span than did its appetite for short-term U.S. Treasury bills.

In August 2008, before the bank bailout and the stimulus law, overall Chinese holdings of U.S. debt stood at $573.7 billion. That number continued to escalate past May 2009– when China started to reduce its holdings in short-term Treasury bills–and ultimately peaked at $1.1753 trillion last October.

As of March 2011, overall Chinese holdings of U.S. debt had decreased to 1.1449 trillion.

Most of the U.S. national debt is made up of publicly marketable securities sold by the Treasury Department and I.O.U.s called “intragovernmental” bonds that the Treasury has given to so-called government trust funds—such as the Social Security trust funds—when it has spent the trust funds’ money on other government expenses.

The publicly marketable segment of the national debt includes Treasury bills, which (as defined by the Treasury) mature in terms of one-year or less; Treasury notes, which mature in terms of 2 to 10 years; Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS), which mature in terms of 5, 10 and 30 years; and Treasury bonds, which mature in terms of 30 years.

At the end of August 2008, before the financial bailout and the stimulus, the publicly marketable segment of the U.S. national debt was 4.88 trillion. Of that, $2.56 trillion was in the intermediate-term Treasury notes, $1.22 trillion was in short-term Treasury bills, $582.8 billion was in long-term Treasury bonds, and $521.3 billion was in TIPS.

At the end of March 2011, by which time the Chinese had dropped their Treasury bill holdings 97 percent from their peak, the publicly marketable segment of the U.S. national debt had almost doubled from August 2008, hitting $9.11 trillion. Of that $9.11 trillion, $5.8 trillion was in intermediate-term Treasury notes, $1.7 trillion was in short-term Treasury bills; $931.5 billion was in long-term Treasury bonds, and $640.7 billion was in TIPS.

Before the end of March 2012, the Treasury must redeem all of the $1.7 trillion in Treasury bills that were extant as of March 2011 and find new or old buyers who will continue to invest in U.S. debt. But, for now, the Chinese at least do not appear to be bullish customers of short-term U.S. debt.

Treasury bills carry lower interest rates than longer-term Treasury notes and bonds, but the longer term notes and bonds are exposed to a greater risk of losing their value to inflation. To the degree that the $1.7 trillion in short-term U.S. Treasury bills extant as of March must be converted into longer-term U.S. Treasury securities, the U.S. government will be forced to pay a higher annual interest rate on the national debt.

As of the close of business on Thursday, the total U.S. debt was $14.34 trillion, according to the Daily Treasury Statement. Of that, approximately $9.74 trillion was debt held by the public and approximately $4.61 trillion was “intragovernmental” debt.

From:  http://cnsnews.com/news/article/china-has-divested-97-percent-its-holdin


Comfy With Commies: Obama Hosts Chinese Leader Like a Conquering Hero; Says “We Welcome China’s Rise”

January 20, 2011

China’s rapid growth is often painted as a threat to American interests. But President Obama said today that the country’s economic progress benefits the United States and opens the door to greater international stability and humanitarian progress.

 

“We welcome China’s rise,” Mr. Obama said at a press conference at the White House with Chinese President Hu Jintao. “I absolutely believe that China’s peaceful rise is good for the world, and it’s good for America.”

 

He added, “We just want to make sure that that rise occurs in a way that reinforces international norms and international rules, and enhances security and peace, as opposed to it being a source of conflict either in the region or around the world.”

 

Mr. Obama acknowledged today that China’s poor human rights record remains a “source of tension” between the two countries. However, he said the nation’s development will lift millions out of poverty, “and that’s a positive good for the world, and it’s something that the United States very much appreciates and respects.”

 

From:  http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-503544_162-20028958-503544.html