Why Would This Intelligent Black Woman Refuse to Vote for Barack Obama?

September 27, 2010

 

 This is Ann Wortham. 

She is  Associate Professor of Sociology at Illinois State University  and continuing Visiting Scholar at  Stanford University ‘s Hoover Institution. 

She is a member of the American Sociological Association and the American Philosophical Association. 
 
She has been a John M. Olin Foundation Faculty Fellow, and honored as a Distinguished Alumni of the Year by the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education. 
 
In fall 1988 she was one of a select group of intellectuals who were featured in Bill Moyer’s television series, “A World of Ideas.” The transcript of her conversation with Moyers has been published in his book, A World of Ideas. 
 
Dr. Wortham is author of “The Other Side of Racism: A Philosophical Study of Black Race Consciousness” which analyzes how race consciousness is transformed into political strategies and policy issues. 
 
She has published numerous articles on the implications of individual rights for civil rights policy, and is currently writing a book on theories of social and cultural marginality.
 
Recently, she has published articles on the significance of multiculturalism and Afrocentricism in education, the politics of victimization and the social and political impact of political correctness. Shortly after an interview in 2004, she was awarded tenure.
 
 
This article by her is really, really something.  

 

Fellow Americans,
 
Please know: I am Black; I grew up in the segregated South. I did not vote for Barack Obama; I wrote in Ron Paul’s name as my choice for president.

 

Most importantly, I am not race conscious. I do not require a Black president to know that I am a person of worth, and that life is worth living. I do not require a Black president to love the ideal of America .
 
I cannot join you in your celebration. I feel no elation.

 

There is no smile on my face. I am not jumping with joy.

 

There are no tears of triumph in my eyes. For such emotions and behavior to come from me, I would have to deny all that I know about the requirements of human flourishing and survival – all that I know about the history of the United States of America, all that I know about American race relations, and all that I know about Barack Obama as a politician.

 

I would have to deny the nature of the “change” that Obama asserts has come to America .
 
Most importantly, I would have to abnegate my certain understanding that you have chosen to sprint down the road to serfdom that we have been on for over a century.

 

I would have to pretend that individual liberty has no value for the success of a human life. I would have to evade your rejection of the slender reed of capitalism on which your success and mine depend.

 

I would have to think it somehow rational that 94 percent of the 12 million Blacks in this country voted for a man because he looks like them (that Blacks are permitted to play the race card), and that they were joined by self-declared “progressive” whites who voted for him because he doesn’t look like them.
 
I would have to wipe my mind clean of all that I know about the kind of people who have advised and taught Barack Obama and will fill posts in his administration – political intellectuals like my former colleagues at the Harvard University ‘s Kennedy School of Government.
 
I would have to believe that “fairness” is equivalent of justice.

 

I would have to believe that a man who asks me to “go forward in a new spirit of service, in a new service of sacrifice” is speaking in my interest.

 

I would have to accept the premise of a man that economic prosperity comes from the “bottom up,” and who arrogantly believes that he can will it into existence by the use of government force.

 

I would have to admire a man who thinks the standard of living of the masses can be improved by destroying the most productive and the generators of wealth.
 
Finally, Americans, I would have to erase from my consciousness the scene of 125,000 screaming, crying, cheering people in Grant Park, Chicago irrationally chanting “Yes We Can!”

 

And I would have to wipe all memory of all the times I have heard politicians, pundits, journalists, editorialists, bloggers and intellectuals declare that capitalism is dead – and no one, including especially Alan Greenspan, objected to their assumption that the particular version of the anti-capitalistic mentality that they want to replace with their own version of anti-capitalism is anything remotely equivalent to capitalism.
 
So you have made history, Americans. You and your children have elected a Black man to the office of the president of the United States, the wounded giant of the world.

 

The battle between John Wayne and Jane Fonda is over – and Fonda won.

 

Eugene McCarthy and George McGovern must be very happy men. Jimmie Carter, too. And the Kennedys have at last gotten their Kennedy look-a-like. The self-righteous welfare statists in the suburbs can feel warm moments of satisfaction for having elected a Black person.
 
So, toast yourselves: 60s countercultural radicals, 80s yuppies and 90s bourgeois bohemians. Toast yourselves, Black America.

 

Shout your glee Harvard, Princeton , Yale, Duke, Stanford, and Berkeley. You have elected not an individual who is qualified to be president, but a Black man who, like the pragmatist Franklin Roosevelt, promises to – Do Something!

 

You now have someone who has picked up the baton of Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society. But you have also foolishly traded your freedom and mine – what little there is left – for the chance to feel good. 
 
There is nothing in me that can share your happy obliviousness. God Help Us all.

 

 

 

Ann Wortham

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Michelle Obama turns to race-baiting; tells NAACP “Tea Party members are racists who are trying to turn back progress”…

July 13, 2010

You can see how it’s going to go now, in the run up to the November elections. 

The Tea Party will be termed “racist” and the Tea Party hierarchy will be put on the defensive by the liberal media and race-baiting organizations such as the NAACP who will repeatedly — ad nauseum — call on the Tea Party to “repudiate racist elements” in the movement. 

This is the tactic they’ve decided to use in order to brand the Tea Party movement and its limited government ideals as “racist.”  Of course, it is in complete denial of the fact that the Tea Party movement and its limited government ideals are in no small part being led and/or supported by conservative black patriots such as author and publisher William Owens, singer Lloyd Marcus, Kevin Jackson of The Black Sphere, Congressional candidate Allen West and numerous others.

But truth and reality have no hold on liberals.  They know they’re losing the battle for the minds of Americans — Democrat and Republican alike — to plain old common sense.  And therefore out of desperation they have to portray the Tea Party limited government ideal as a racist ideal, and the movement itself as being beset with racists.   

When the NAACP comes out and seriously condemns SEIU anti-white racism and Black Panther anti-white racism, then maybe I’ll listen to what they have to say.  Meanwhile, they, and Michelle O., can take their race-baiting act somewhere else.  It won’t fly here.  

— Spencer

Michelle Obama turns to race-baiting; tells NAACP “Tea Party members are racist and trying to turn back progress”…

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/naacp-tea-party-civil-rights-group-considers-resolution/story?id=11144640

First Lady Michelle Obama brought renewed energy to the NAACP today, delivering the keynote speech at the annual convention one day before the nation’s largest civil rights group is expected to condemn what it calls racist elements in the Tea Party movement.

The nation’s largest and oldest civil rights organization will vote on the resolution Tuesday during its annual convention in Kansas City, Mo. In addition to jobs and the economy, anti-Tea Party activism has been a large focus of the gathering, a charge that conservative leaders say is driven solely by a political agenda.

In her speech, the first lady focused on the issue of childhood obesity and her “Let’s Move” initiative, but outside of her remarks, anti-Tea Party activism has been a key focus of the gathering, which conservative leaders say is driven solely by a political agenda.

Tea Party members have used “racial epithets,” have verbally abused black members of Congress and threatened them, and protestors have engaged in “explicitly racist behavior” and “displayed signs and posters intended to degrade people of color generally and President Barack Obama specifically,” according to the proposed resolution.

“We’re deeply concerned about elements that are trying to move the country back, trying to reverse progress that we’ve made,” NAACP spokeswoman Leila McDowell told ABC News. “We are asking that the law-abiding members of the Tea Party repudiate those racist elements, that they recognize the historic and present racist elements that are within the Tea Party movement.”

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, in coordination with 170 other groups, including labor unions, is planning a protest march in Washington, D.C., Oct. 10 as the next step in building momentum against the Tea Party.

The “One Nation” march is designed as an antithesis to the Tea Party, and it’s about “pulling America together and back to work,” McDowell said.

Supporters of the Tea Party movement have frequently faced charges of racism.

The most notable case is that of Kentucky  GOP Senate hopeful Rand Paul , who came under fire in May for criticizing the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Paul said he supports the act and opposes discrimination, but added that the government doesn’t have a right to tell private restaurant owners who they can and cannot serve.

“If we want to harbor in on private businesses and their policies, then you have to have the discussion about, ‘Do you want to abridge the First Amendment as well,'” Paul said on MSNBC’s  Rachel Maddow show. “If you decide that restaurants are publicly owned and not privately owned, then do you say that you should have the right to bring your gun into the restaurant, even though the owner of the restaurant says, well, no, we don’t want to have guns in here.”

In March, Tea Party protesters opposing the health care bill were alleged to have shouted racial slurs at black House members in the halls of Congress, a charge that Tea Party supporters say has not been proven. Liberal blogs have also seized on signs that have appeared in Tea Party protests, comparing President Obama to a monkey.

Tea Party leaders say the charges are misguided and are being fertilized by the left for the sole purpose of gaining political ground.

 The Rev. C.L. Bryant, a former president of NAACP’s Garland, Texas, chapter who is now a leading Tea Party activist said the idea that the Tea Party is racist or is trying to instigate a racist climate is “simply a lie.”

 “I have seen posters … where every president from Reagan to Obama has been called a fascist,” Bryant, who serves as a contributor to FreedomWorks, which organizes Tea Party groups, told ABC News. “Why is it that just because we have a black president, we are hyper-sensitive to posters at rallies?”

The NAACP wants to “create a climate where they can say that those on the right are in fact racist and those on the left are their saviors,” he added. “This is very much what the liberal agenda is about.”

Dale Robertson , a Tea Party activist who runs TeaParty.org and has himself been at the center of a race-related controversy, said the NAACP is merely pandering to the Democratic party.

 “I find that the NAACP should be standing against the new Black Panther and their stance and yet instead of doing the right thing, they’re doing the wrong thing by attacking people who feel government should be held accountable,” Robertson said.